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English-based creole spoken in Jamaica
Country where Jamaican Patois is spoken.

Jamaican Creole, or "Patois" (Jumiekan Kryuol or Jumiekan Patwa), is an English-based creole spoken in Jamaica and the diaspora, and has become a lingua franca in the Bocas del Toro and Limón provinces in Panama and Costa Rica respectively. Although it is not considered an official language due to its social implications, it is the language used by inhabitants in daily life, and to a limited extent, the government. It is considered the most distinctive form of creole spoken in the Caribbean region. A fairly easy language to learn, the fact that it is English-based makes it easier for English speakers to grasp adequate grammar to get around. However, the wide vocabulary stemming from the ever-changing vernacular and its local twists makes it quite difficult, if not nearly impossible, for non-native speakers to fully comprehend the language. It is heavily based on English, but there are significant traces of West African vocabularies and those of earlier immigrants. While being a spoken language, written forms can be in any form, as long as the meaning is accurately conveyed.

GrammarEdit

PronounsEdit

  • I mi
  • you (singular) yuh
  • he ‘im
  • she shi (changes to "im" on the Western side of the island)
  • it i
  • we wi
  • you (plural) oonu
  • they dem (pronounced "DAYÑ")
  • Possessive pronouns are made by placing a "fi" before the pronouns listed above, eg., fi mi can be transliterated as for me or mine, and so on.

Present tenseEdit

There is no conjugation whatsoever, as given in the following example:

  • Mi wash - I wash. For the present progressive, or the gerund, ah or deh is placed after the pronoun. For example, mi deh wash or mi ah wash would mean I am washing.

Past tenseEdit

The same layout for the present tense can be used for the past, so mi wash can mean I wash or I washed. For the past progressive, however, wendeh (pronounced WAYNE-deh) or did ah is used, like this:

  • Mi did a wash yuh clothes (mi DIDDAH wash you CLUE-ahz) - I was washing your clothes.
  • Marilyn wendeh talk an' Juniah come intarrup’ - Marilyn was talking when Junior came and interrupted.

Future TenseEdit

Stating intentions and prospective action can be done in one of two ways:

  • Using guh/aguh after a pronoun, eg., Mi aguh tell ’im fi lef’ mi alone. (MEE-agoh TELLIM fi LEF mi al-WOHN) - I'm going to tell him to leave me alone.

Just a few more tipsEdit

The definite article is di (also spelled de). Indefinite articles are written as they are in English, but most times are pronounced with a nasal tone. Some would be pronounced SOÑ, one would be pronounced WAAÑ, etc. To pluralise nouns, dem is added. For example, shoes would be "shoes dem", and fingers would be "fingah dem". Exclusively, breaking common English grammar rules, foot is not pluralised to feet, but "foot dem", and tooth is never used. Teet’ (dem) sounds appropriate to a native patois speaker.

Pronunciation guideEdit

VowelsEdit

  • A (a) as in father
  • E (e) as in ten
  • I (i) as in machine
  • O (o) as in open
  • U (u) as in rule

ConsonantsEdit

  • b

like 'b' in "bed"

  • c

like 's' in "supper", 'k' in "kid"

  • d

like 'd' in "dog"

  • f

like 'ph' in "phone"

  • g

like 'g' in "go", 'j' in "jello"

  • h

like 'h' in "help" (often silent in the UK and other Commonwealth countries)

  • j

like 'dg' in "edge"

  • k

like 'c' in "cat"

  • l

like 'l' in "love"

  • m

like 'm' in "mother"

  • n

like 'n' in "nice". Jamaicans have a tendency of nasalizing "n" in many cases, as in one (WAAÑ) or want (WAAÑ).

  • p

like 'p' in "pig"

  • q

like 'q' in "quest" (with "u", almost always)

  • r

like 'r' in "row", like 'r' in "feather" (often silent in the UK and other Commonwealth countries at end of word)

  • s

like 'ss' in "hiss", like 'z' in "haze"

  • t

like 't' in "top"

  • v

like 'v' in "victory"

  • w

like 'w' in "weight"

  • x

like 'cks' in "kicks", like 'z' in "haze" (at beginning of a word)

  • y

like 'y' in "yes", like 'ie' in "pie", like 'ee' in "flee"

  • z

like 'z' in "haze"

Common diphthongsEdit

Jamaicans tend to stress their "Th" sounds by placing a "d" in front of words. For example: the word The, is pronounced "di" instead of "The".

The voiced dental fricative /ð/ (as in this) is replaced with 'd', and the voiceless dental fricative /θ/ (thing) is replaced with 't'.

Jamaicans pronounce the number 3 (three), like 🌳 (tree).

Phrase listEdit

  Note: With strongest caution, it is recommended that visitors to the island use Standard English when in formal settings. However, code-switching is tolerated. This phrasebook serves as a means of effectively communicating with locals, especially in the rural areas.

BasicsEdit

Common signs


Signs are always written in English (with the British spelling), although some places like museums and other cultural places might have signs in Patois. This is extremely rare. Most of them are written as is, unless otherwise noted.

OPEN 
Oapen
CLOSED 
Cloas
ENTRANCE 
Enchance
EXIT 
Exit
PUSH 
Push
PULL 
Pull
TOILET 
Tailit
MEN 
Men
WOMEN 
Ooman
FORBIDDEN 
Faabidden
Hello. 
Hello
Hello. (informal
Wapm (WAH- 'm)
How are you? 
How yuh do? (How yoh DOO?)/ Howd'y (HOW-di?)/Wapm? (lit. "What happens/is happening?"). Another way of saying this is "Waah gwaan?"(Pronounced as is)
Fine, thank you. 
Fine, tank yuh (Fyn tank YUH).
What is your name? 
Wha' yuh (sing.)/oonu (pl.) name? ( wah yoh/unu NYEM?)
My name is ______ . 
Me/mi niem ______ . ( mi 'NYEM _____ .)
Nice to meet you
(This is almost never used when in continuous use of Patwa. When it is, articulation is rather sharp)
Please. 
As is (PLIIZ ). Or, duh (DOO) is used to intensify the atmosphere of the word.
Thank you. 
Tank yuh. Or simply' tanks' (With the 'a' having the sound of that in 'art').
You're welcome. 
Yuh welkom; long welkom.
Yes. 
Yah ( Yah (like German "ja")
No. 
No . (Jamaicans sometimes tend to stress out the word to " Noa" -- like "Noooah"
Excuse me. (getting attention
Ekscyooz mi; "Oi!" is sometimes used, but is considered vulgar and disrespectful.
Excuse me. (begging pardon
I'm sorry. 
Sarry. (Think of the Indian dress).
Goodbye 
Ba bye. (Pronounced: bha baii )
Goodbye (informal
Ta taa.
I can't speak name of language [well]. 
Mi cyaa talk ...[ gud].
Do you speak English? 
Yuh (sing.) speak/talk English?/Oonu (pl.) speak/talk English?
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
Smaddy deh yah who can talk Inglish?
Help! 
'elp
Look out! 
pronounced as [luk 'OHT].
Good morning. 
Gud mawnin'.
Good evening. 
Gud evenin' (sometimes inflected as ‘EVE-lin).
Good night. 
Pronounced as is, although night is written as "nite".
I don't understand. 
Mi nuh andastan'.
Where is the toilet? 
Which paat de tailit (deh)?/Wheh det tailit deh?

ProblemsEdit

Leave me alone. 
Lef mi alone. (LEHF mi ah-LUOHN.)
Don't touch me! 
Nuh touch mi!
I'll call the police. 
Mi ah guh call di/e police.
Police!
Stop! Thief! 
(S)tap (di) tief! If you speak German, then the word for "deep" is pronounced exactly like "thief" in Patwa.
I need your help. 
Mi want yuh(sing.)/oonu(pl.) help. (mi WAAÑ yoh/unu EHLP .)
It's an emergency. 
Ah one emergency. ( AH waañ ih-MERR-jen-sih.)
I'm lost. 
Mi lost. (mi LAHS'.)
I lost my bag. 
Mi lost mi bag. (mi LAHS mi BAG.)
I lost my wallet. 
. (mi LAHS mi WAH-lit .)
I'm sick. 
Mi sick.
I've been injured. 
Mi get injuh. . (mi get EEN-joe.)
I need a doctor. 
Mi need one doctah. (mi NEED waañ DAK-tah.)
Can I use your phone? 
Mi can use yuh phone? ( mi cyaañ YOOZ yuh FWON?)

NumbersEdit

(wan)
(too)
(trii)
(FWOHR)
(fighv)
(six)
(SEHV'N)
(EE-EHT)
(nighn)
10 
(tehn)
11 
('LEV'N)
12 
(TWEHLV)
13 
(TURR-tiin)
14 
(FWOH-tiin)
15 
(FIFF-tiin)
16 
(SIX-tiin)
17 
(SEHV'N-tiin)
18 
(EE-EH-tiin)
19 
(NINE-tiin)
20 
(TWEN-ti)
21 
(TWEN-ti WAN)
22 
(TWEN-ti TOO)
23 
(TWEN-ti TRII)
30 
(TOH-ti)
40 
(FAAH-ti)
50 
(FIFF-ti)
60 
(SIX-ti)
70 
(SEHV'N-ti)
80 
(EE-EH-ti)
90 
(NIGHN-ti)
100 
(OHN-jihd)
200 
(TOO OHN-jihd)
300 
(TRII OHN-jihd)
1,000 
(TOH-z'n)
2,000 
(TOO TOH-zn)
1,000,000 
(WAN mill-yan)
1,000,000,000 
(WAN bil-yan)
1,000,000,000,000 
(WAN trill-yan)
number _____ (train, bus, etc.) 
Numbah(NOM-bah)
half 
Half (aaf)
less
Less (Les' )
more 
(MWAH)

TimeEdit

now 
Now
later 
Latah(LIEH-tah)
before 
Before(bih-FWOHR)
morning 
Mawnin'.
afternoon 
Aftahnoon.
evening 
Evening.
night 
Nite.

Clock timeEdit

one o'clock AM 
One ah clock inna de mawnin',(" ")
two o'clock AM 
Two ah clock inna de mawnin', ( )
noon 
"Twelve ah clock" is always used.
one o'clock PM 
One ah clock inna de evening.
two o'clock PM 
Two ah clock inna de evening.
midnight 
( )

DurationEdit

_____ minute(s) 
_____minute (never pluralised. (MIN-it)
_____ hour(s) 
_____hour(OWAH)
_____ day(s) 
_____day(DIEH)
_____ week(s) 
_____week
_____ month(s) 
_____mont'
_____ year(s) 
_____year( EE-ehr)

DaysEdit

today 
tiddeh.
yesterday 
yestideh
tomorrow 
tomarroh(too-MAW-roh)
this week 
"dis week" or "dis yah week (yah)"
last week 
laas' week
next week 
nex' week
Sunday 
Sundeh ( )
Monday 
Mondeh ( )
Tuesday 
Choozdeh( )
Wednesday 
Wensdeh )
Thursday 
Tursdeh( )
Friday 
Frideh( )
Saturday 
"Satdeh" or "Satideh" ( )

MonthsEdit

January 
(JAHN-e-WERRY)
February 
(FEB-e-WERRY)
March 
(MAACH)
April 
(EEH-EH-pril)
May 
(MEE-EH)
June 
(JOON)
July 
(joo-LAI)
August 
(AW-gus')
September 
(sep-TEM-bah)
October 
(ACK-twoh-bah)
November 
(noh-VEM-bah)
December 
(dih-SEM-bah)

Writing time and dateEdit

ColorsEdit

black 
(bh'lack)
white 
(WHy't)
gray 
(GRIH-eh)
red 
(rhed)
blue 
(b'lue)
yellow 
(YH'ello)
green 
(GH'reen)
orange 
(AH-RINDGE)
purple 
(PH'urphl)
brown 
(BROHN)

TransportationEdit

 
Street in Montego Bay, Jamaica

Bus and trainEdit

How much is a ticket to _____? 
How much fe one ticket fe goh ah_____ (OOH much fi waañ TIH-kit fi gaa...)
One ticket to _____, please. 
One ticket fe goh ah _____, please.
Where does this train/bus go? 
Which part dis yah train/bus (yah) deh goh? (WITCH paat dis YAH TRIEHN/BOHS yah deh GOH)
Where is the train/bus to _____? 
Which part de/i train/bus fe goh ah _____ (deh)?( )
Does this train/bus stop in _____? 
Dah train/bus yah (s)tap inna_____? ( )
When does the train/bus for _____ leave? 
(Ah) when de/i train/bus fi goh ah _____ (deh) lef'? ( )
When will this train/bus arrive in _____? 
(Ah) when dis yah train/bus yah (a)goh reach inna_____? ( )

DirectionsEdit

How do I get to _____ ? 
How mi reach a _____? ( )
...the train station? 
Di train station?(di TRI-EHN sti-eh-SHAN?)
...the bus station? 
...di bus station(di BOHS sti-eh-SHAN?)
...the airport? 
...di airport?(di YEAR-pwaht?)
...downtown? 
(dung-TOHN?)
...the youth hostel? 
(di yout' astel)
...the _____ hotel? 
...di 'otel?( )
...the American/Canadian/Australian/British consulate? 
...di American/Canadian/Australian/British consilate?( di ah-MERR-kahn/kiah-NIEH-dian/ahs-TRIEH-lian kan-sih-LET?)
Where are there a lot of... 
Which part whole 'eap a ... (deh)?(WITCH paat wohl EEP ah ...DEH?)
...hotels? 
...'otel?( )
...restaurants? 
...restaurant(REHS-tah-RAHNT?)
...bars? 
...bar?( )
...sites to see? 
...site fe si?( )
Can you show me on the map? 
Yuh can show mi pon de/i map?( )
street 
(CHEAT)
Turn left. 
Tun lef'.( )
Turn right. 
Tun right. ( )
left 
Lef'.( )
right 
Right.( )
straight ahead 
(S)traight ahead./ Right up deh suh (Right up there) ( )
towards the _____ 
Towards de/i _____ ( )
past the _____ 
Paas' de/i _____ ( )
before the _____ 
Before de/i _____ ( )
Watch for the _____. 
Watch fe de/i _____ ( )
intersection 
Intahsecshan' ( )
north 
nawt' (na'aht)
south 
sout' (so'ut)
east 
eas' (heis' )
west 
wes' (whes' )
uphill 
uphill (up-pill)
downhill 
dunghill (dhung - ill)

TaxiEdit

Taxi! 
( )
Take me to _____, please. 
Cyar mi go (a) _____, please. (Kee'-ar mi guh (a)____ )
How much does it cost to get to _____? 
How much fi guh a_____?(Ooh much fi goh a_____)
Take me there, please. 
( )

LodgingEdit

 
Negril Beach, hotel and bar
Do you have any rooms available? 
Unuh have any room available (Oono AV' enny room avieh-LEBBL'? )
How much is a room for one person/two people? 
Ow much is a room fi one/ two smaddy? ('Ow much is a room fi wan/ too smaddie )
Does the room come with... 
Di room come wid? ( )
...bedsheets? 
...bedsheet'? ( )
...a bathroom? 
( baa-CHOOM )
...a telephone? 
(waa TEH-li-FWAN )
...a TV? 
(waa TV? )
May I see the room first? 
Mi cya see di room fus? (M'i cyaa si di room fuss?)
Do you have anything quieter? 
Yuh 'ave anyting quietah? (yoh AHV en-ihting KWAI-ehtah?)
...bigger? 
Bigga (bih-GAH?)
...cleaner? 
(clee-NAH?)
...cheaper? 
(chee-PAH?)
OK, I'll take it. 
Arite mi will tek it (lit: Alright, I'll take it (Ahrite mi will tek it )
I will stay for _____ night(s). 
Mi ago tan fi ______ nite(s) ( )
Can you suggest another hotel? 
Yuh can sugges' wan neddah 'otel? ( )
Do you have a safe? 
Yuh 'ave one safe? (Safe is pronounced as si-EFF. ( )
...lockers? 
...lockah? (lah-KAH?)
Is breakfast/supper included? 
Breakfas'/suppah come wid it? (Lit. "does breakfast/supper come with it?" (brehk-FUSS/soh-PAH come WID e?)
What time is breakfast/supper? 
Ah whah time oonu saab (serve)/'ave breakfas'/suppah? (Lit. "what time do you serve/have breakfast/suppah?" ( )
Please clean my room. 
Yuh (sing.)/oonu (pl.) can clean (up) mi room (please)? ( )
Can you wake me at _____? 
Yuh(sing.)/oonu (pl.) can wake mi up ah _____ ah clack? ( )
I want to check out. 
Mi waan (to) check out. (mi WAAÑ check OHT.)

MoneyEdit

Do you accept American/Australian/Canadian dollars? 
Oonu (pl.) tek American/Australian/Canadian dollah? (Unu tehk ah-MURR-can/ahs-TRIEH-lian/cyah-NIEH-dian dah-LAH?)
Do you accept British pounds? 
Oonu (pl.) tek British poun'? (Unu tehk BRIH-tish POHN'?)
Do you accept Euros? 
Oonu (pl.) tek Euro? (Unu tehk YOO roh?)
Do you accept credit cards? 
Oonu tek credit card? (Unu tehk CREH-dit CYAAHD?)
Can you change money for me? 
Yuh can change some (SOÑ) money fi mi?( )
Where can I get money changed? 
(Ah) wheh/which part mi can change (chi-EHNJ) money? ( )
Can you change a traveler's check for me? 
Yuh can change one trav'lah check fi mi? ( )
Where can I get a traveler's check changed? 
(Ah) wheh/which part (PAAT) mi can change trav'lah check? ( )
What is the exchange rate? 
(Ah) whah e exchange rate (RIET)? ( )
Where is an automatic teller machine (ATM)? 
(Ah) which part one ATM (deh)? ( )

EatingEdit

 
Curry Goat and Rice, a popular Jamaican dish
A table for one person/two people, please. 
One table fi one/two smaddy pliiz.
Can I look at the menu, please? 
Mi can look pan di menu pliiz?
Can I look in the kitchen? 
Mi can look inna di kitchen?
Is there a house specialty? 
Oonu 'ave house (OHSS) specialty?
Is there a local specialty? 
Oonu 'ave none ("noñ", like in French) local (LWOH-kal) specialty?
I'm a vegetarian. 
Mi a vegetarian. (MEE ah VEH-jih-TIEH-rian)
I don't eat pork. 
Mi nuh eat pork (PWOK)
I don't eat beef. 
Mi nuh eat biif.
I only eat kosher food. 
Mi only/ongle eat koshah (KWOH-shah) food.
Can you make it "lite", please? (less oil/butter/lard
Yuh can put less amount (ah-MOHNT) a oil (HAH-eel)/buttah/laad inna it pliiz?
fixed-price meal 
fix price meal
a la carte 
said as is.
breakfast 
breakfas' (BREK-fuss)
lunch 
(LONCH)
tea (meal
Teatime is not a typical Jamaican custom.
supper 
suppah
I want _____. 
Mi want _____
I want a dish containing _____. 
Mi want one dish wid _____.
chicken 
(CHIH-kin)
beef 
biif
fish 
fish
ham 
'am
sausage 
satchiz'
cheese 
(CHIIZ)
eggs 
(HEG)
salad 
Said as is.
(fresh) vegetables 
(fresh) vegetable
(fresh) fruit 
Said as is.
bread 
(BREHD)
toast 
toas' (TWOHS)
noodles 
(NOOGLE)
rice 
(RAISS)
beans 
(BIIN)
May I have a glass of _____? 
Mi can get a glass ah _____?
May I have a cup of _____? 
Mi can get a cup ah _____?
May I have a bottle of _____? 
Mi can get a bakkle ah _____?
coffee 
caffee (pronounced like "KAH-fi" or "KYAA-fi")
tea (drink
tea
juice 
joos'
(bubbly) water 
bubble wata
(still) water 
(still) wata
beer 
(BIEHR)
red/white wine 
Said as is.
May I have some _____? 
Mi can get some _____?
salt 
(SAALT)
black pepper 
black peppah
butter 
buttah
Excuse me, waiter? (getting attention of server)
Excuse mi waitah (eks-KYOOZ mi wieh-TAH)
I'm finished. 
Mi finish'.
It was delicious. 
It did nice/delicious ( )
Please clear the plates. 
Pliiz clear (KLIEHR) di plate (PLIEHT) dem.
The check, please. 
Mi can get di check pliiz?

BarsEdit

Do you serve alcohol? 
Oonu (pl.) serve alchohol (AL-koh-WAL)?
Is there table service? 
Oonu 'ave table (TIEH-b'l) service?
A beer/two beers, please. 
One beer (bee-YEAR)/two beer, pliiz.
A glass of red/white wine, please. 
One glass ah red wine pliiz.
A pint, please. 
One pint, pliiz.
A bottle, please. 
One bottle (BAH-k'l) pliiz.
_____ (hard liquor) and _____ (mixer), please. 
_____('aad likkah) an' _____ (mixah) pliiz.
whiskey 
(WHIS-kih)
vodka 
(VAD-kah)
rum 
(ROHM)
water 
Wata. (There is a local brand of cranberry water bearing the name so being a little more specific would help.)
club soda 
club soda (SWOH-dah)
tonic water 
tanic wata
orange juice 
orange (AH-rindge) juice.
Coke (soda
Coke (KWOK)
Do you have any bar snacks? 
Oonu 'ave no bar snacks?
One more, please. 
One more, pliiz. (WAN mwor PLIIZ)
Another round, please. 
One (WAAÑ) neddah roun' (ROHN) pliiz.
When is closing time? 
(Ah) when oonu lock up? (Lit. "when do you lock up?")
Cheers! 
(CHEE-yerrz!)

ShoppingEdit

Do you have this in my size? 
Yuh (sing.)/Oonu (pl.) 'ave did inna fe mi size?
How much is this? 
How much fe dis? (OO much fe dis?)
That's too expensive. 
Dat too expensive; although "dear" is more commonly used.
Would you take _____? 
Yuh(sing.)/Oonu(pl.) gwine/goh tek _____?( )
expensive 
( )
cheap 
( )
I can't afford it. 
Mi cyaa afford e.(mi CYAAÑ ah-FWOHD i )
I don't want it. 
Mi nuh want e. ( )
You're cheating me. 
Yuh deh tief mi.
I'm not interested. 
Mi nuh intrestid. (..)
OK, I'll take it. 
Alrite, mi goh tek e.
Can I have a bag? 
Mi can get a bag?
Do you ship (overseas)? 
Yuh (sing.)/Oonu (pl.) ship ovah-seas?
I need... 
Mi need...
...toothpaste. 
(toot-PIEHS)
...a toothbrush. 
(toot-BROSH)
...tampons. 
. (tam-PAN)
...soap. 
(SWOHP )
...shampoo. 
(sham-POO)
...pain reliever. (e.g., aspirin or ibuprofen
(pee-EN rih-LEE-vah)
...cold medicine. 
(KUOHL meh-dih-S'N )
...stomach medicine. 
... ((S)TOO-MOHK meh-dih-S'N )
...a razor. 
(waañ RIEH-zah )
...an umbrella. 
(waañ AHM-BREH-lah )
...sunblock lotion. 
(sun-BLACK LUOH-shan )
...a postcard. 
(waañ PWOHS-kiaahd )
...postage stamps. 
(PWOHS-tihj (s)tamp )
...batteries. 
(bah-TRIH)
...writing paper. 
(RAI-tin PIEH-pah )
...a pen. 
...one pen.
...English-language books. 
...English-langwidge book.
...English-language magazines. 
English-lang-widge magazine.
...an English-language newspaper. 
(waañ ING-glish LANG-widge -NYOOZ-PIEH-PAH )
...an English-English dictionary. 
(waañ ING-glish tooh ING-glish DIK-shih-NERRY )

NB: The local papers are in English.

DrivingEdit

I want to rent a car. 
Mi waan rent one car. (mi WAAÑ rent waañ CYAAR )
Can I get insurance? 
Mi can get insurance? (mi cyaañ GET in-SHWO-rans? )

Note:

Translation of these phrases are utterly unnecessary. They are always written in English. The pronunciations given only apply in spoken form.

stop (on a street sign
(Tap)
one way 
(WAN wieh)
yield 
(YIIL')
no parking 
(NOHÑ PAH-kin)
speed limit 
(Spiid limit)
gas (petrol) station 
(GIAHS (peh-TRUAL) STIEH-shan)
petrol 
(peh-TRUAL)
diesel 
(DEE-z'r)

AuthorityEdit

I haven't done anything wrong. 
Mi nuh do nutn' wrong.(Mi noh DOO nuh-n RAHNG)
It was a misunderstanding. 
A did waa misandastandin'.(Ah did waah MIS-ANDAH-STANDIN)
Where are you taking me? 
Weh yuh(sing.)/oonu(pl.) deh cyar mi guh?(Weh yoh/oonooh deh KI-AR mi goh?)
Am I under arrest? 
Mi anda arres'?(Mi andah ah-RESS?)
I am an American/Australian/British/Canadian citizen. 
Mi a one American/Australian/British/Canadian citiz'n. (mi ah WAAÑ ah-MURR-can ahs-TRIEH-lian/BRIH-tish/cyah-NIEH-dian SI-tih-s'n.)
I want to talk to the American/Australian/British/Canadian embassy/consulate. 
Mi waa (fi) talk to di American/Australian/British/Canadian embassy/consilate. (Mi waañ (fi) TAHK too di ah-MURR-can/ahs-TRIEH-lian/BRIH-tish/cyah-NIEH -dian EHM-bah-si/KAN-sih-LET.)
I want to talk to a lawyer. 
Mi waa talk to a lawya (Mi WAAñ taak to ah LAAH-YAH)
Can I just pay a fine now? 
Mi can gi yuh a likkle supm' now? (Lit. "can I give you a little something now?"
This Jamaican Patois phrasebook is a usable article. It explains pronunciation and the bare essentials of travel communication. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.