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Spanish-based creole language spoken in the Philippines
Phrasebooks > Chavacano phrasebook

Chavacano is a Spanish-based creole spoken in the Philippines. The language is most spoken in Zamboanga City and Christian-majority towns of Basilan, but is also spoken in Cavite City and Ternate, and previously in Ermita, Cotabato City, and Davao. The languages derives most of its vocabulary from Spanish, but the word order and grammar derives from the native languages such as Tagalog and Hiligaynon.

GrammarEdit

While sounding Spanish at first sight, Chavacano has a basic word order of verb-subject-object in line with the native Philippine languages. This is slowly changing however, as the conventional subject-verb-object word order as in conventional Spanish and English is being adopted by younger speakers.

Chavacano does not have grammatical gender or verb conjugations like Spanish. Nouns have natural genders as their Spanish roots, but their corresponding articles are the el (the) and un (a/an), while masculine in Spanish, is generally considered gender-neutral in Chavacano. La and una are only used in the most formal writing, but is also understood and said of as well. Plural nouns are indicated by the article plus maga (borrowed from Hiligaynon) or mana (borrowed from Tagalog mga), e.g. el maga/mana bata ("the children"); los or las plus plural form as in conventional Spanish has almost disappeared from Chavacano except in formal language. Personal names are indicated by si (e.g. Ya dalo si Maria con un regalo a Juan "Mary gave John a gift").

VerbsEdit

Chavacano does not follow the complicated conjugation system of Spanish; instead, verb tense is indicated by particles (e.g. Zamboanga Chavacano uses ya for past, ta for present, ay for future), and the infinitive form is the same as Spanish, except the final -r is omitted and the final syllable accented. The table below provides a guide for forming the basic verb tenses for each Chavacano variety.

Verb conjugations Infinitive Present Past Future
Zamboanga Spanish infinitive minus the final -r (with exceptions) ta + infinitive ya + infinitive ay + infinitive
Cavite ta + infinitive ya + infinitive (Cavite City); a + infinitive (Ternate) di + infinitive
Davao (Abakay, now extinct) Same as in mainstream Spanish Spanish 3rd person singular indicative present Spanish 3rd person singular indicative preterite Infinitive in Zamboanga and Cavite varieties

PronounsEdit

Chavacano (in Zamboanga) also features the inclusive and exclusive "we", borrowed from the Philippine languages; nosotros, less common is most Spanish varieties, is only used in formal language, regardless if they include or exclude the person being spoken to.

With the exception of the 1st and 3rd person singular forms, Chavacano pronouns have a common/familiar and formal forms. Possessive forms only exist in the Zamboanga variety.

Pronunciation guideEdit

Chavacano in written form is only a late development, so there is no standardized spelling. Instead, Chavacano can be written using a Spanish-based, Filipino-based, or a compromise orthography between the former two. The Spanish-based spelling is often used in formal writing (e.g. journalistic writing), while the Filipino-based (using the letters of the abakada) spelling is often used in informal writing. The compromise orthography uses spellings based on etymological roots. For example, "We are eating rice" (with an inclusive "we") in Zamboanga Chavacano can be written in the following ways:

Ta comí quitá con canon. (Spanish-based approach)
Ta komí kitá kon kanon. (Filipino-based approach)
Ta comí kitá con kanon. (compromise spelling)

Regardless of how they are spelled, the sentence is pronounced as Tah koh-MEE key-TAH cohn KAH-non.

This phrasebook uses the compromise spelling, also used in Chavacano teaching materials for kindergarten and elementary students in Zamboanga City and promoted by the city government.

Chavacano varieties are generally mutually intelligible, and most sounds are the same as in most varieties of Spanish, but it is common to interchange e and i, and o and u as commonly encountered in the English spoken by native speakers of Visayan languages (Cebuano, Hiligaynon). The h, while never uttered in most Spanish varieties, is pronounced due to English language influence, and since the h sound corresponds to a g or j in spelling.

VowelsEdit

Vowels are pronounced the same way as in Spanish: short and crisp. At stressed syllables, vowels are lengthened as in Spanish. Accents are not normally used in written Chavacano.

as the "a" in "father"
as the "e" in "bed"
as the "ee" in "feet"
as the "o" in "roll"
as the "u" in "pull"

Spoken Chavacano often elides the following vowel in the next word after a syllable ending in a vowel.

ConsonantsEdit

like 'b' in "bed"
like 's' in "supper" (before 'e' and 'i'), otherwise like 'k' in "kid". In spoken language, when followed by a 'e' or 'i' and another vowel, it is often pronounced like 'sh' in "sheep" (e.g. ciento SHEN-toh, "to have") .
ch 
like 'ch' in "check". (see also 't')
like 'd' in "dog". In spoken language, when followed by a 'e' or 'i' and another vowel, it is often pronounced like 'dg' in "edge" (e.g. Diós "God" is pronounced like Joss).
Same as 'p' (see below)
like 'h' in "hello" (when followed by an "e" or "i"), otherwise like 'g' in "ago" (always hard). In the letter clusters gue and gui, the "u" is only silent so to change the sound, unless the "u" is written with the dieresis (rather uncommon in Chavacano). A final -g is often pronounced as 'k' (see below).
like 'h' in "help" (silent in most Spanish varieties).
like 'h' (see above)
like 'c' in "cat" (only on borrowings from Philippine languages and English)
like 'l' in "love"
ll 
Contemporarily pronounced as two consecutive 'ls', though they can be pronounced like the 'll' in "billion" (as in most Spanish varieties, generally outside Latin America)
like 'm' in "mother"
like 'n' in "nice"
ñ, ny 
like ny in "canyon"
like 'p' in "pig"
like 'k' in "ski" (with "u", always silent)
r, rr 
Chavacano has two 'r' sounds as in Spanish. A Chavacano 'r' is like the 'dd' in "ladder" for American English speakers, while rr is a rolled 'r' following a throaty 'h' sound.
like 's' in "son". In spoken language, when followed by a 'e' or 'i' and another vowel, it is often pronounced like 'sh' in "sheep".
like 't' in "top". In spoken language, when followed by a 'e' or 'i' and another vowel, it is often pronounced like 'ch' in "check"(e.g. tiené cheh-NEH, "to have") .
Same as 'b' above.
like 'w' in "weight" (only in borrowings from Philippine languages and English)
like 'cks' in "kicks".
like 'y' in "yes"
Same as 's' above.

There is no agreed way of spelling out glottal stops (i.e. the catch in the throat heard when saying uh-oh) on borrowings from Philippine languages; they are either indicated by a circumflex on the vowel preceding it, or by a final h. For example, the common negation word pronounced HEN-de' can be spelled as jendê or jendeh. This phrasebook use the former treatment.

Common diphthongsEdit

ai 
like "eye": caido (KAI-doh; fell, or fallen)
ao
like the "ow" in "cow": cuidao (kwee-DAW; watch out)
ea
like "eh-ah": pateá (when pronounced slowly)(pah-TEH-ah; to kick)
ei/ey
like "ay" in "hay": seis (SEYS, six) or rey (king)
eo
like "eh-oh": correo (koh-REH-oh; mail)
ia
like "ee-yah": advertencia (when pronounced slowly)(ad-behr-TEN-see-yah; warning)
ie
like "ee-eh": siempre (see-EHM-preh; of course)
io
like "ee-oh": canción (kan-see-OHN; song)
iu
like "ee-ooh": ciudad (see-ooh-DAD; city)
oi/oy
like "oy" in "boy": (to hear)
ua
like "wa" in "wallet": agua (ah-GWAH, water)
ue
like "we" in "well": cuento (KWEN-toh; story)
ui
like "we": cuidá (kwee-DAH; to take care)

Phrase listEdit

This article concentrates on the most common variety spoken in Zamboanga and Basilan. Forms in the Cavite varieties exist, though less likely to be stumbled upon by travelers as Tagalog is more useful there.

Accents are not normally used in written Chavacano, but are provided to distinguish words that are spelled the same but are stressed differently.

BasicsEdit

Common signs


OPEN 
Abierto
CLOSED 
Cerrado
ENTRANCE 
Entrada
EXIT 
Salida
PUSH 
Empujé
PULL 
Tiré
TOILET 
CR (from English "comfort room", also widely used in other Philippine languages) or baño or casillas
MEN 
Hombre
WOMEN 
Mujer
FORBIDDEN 
Proibido
NO SMOKING
No fumá

By the way, since Chavacano is more of a spoken language, signs in this language can be hard to find, and you are most likely to encounter English signs instead.

Saying "no" in Chavacano

There are multiple ways of saying "no" in Chavacano.

"No hay" 
(from Spanish for "none")
  • Negates a verb in the past tense in a verb-subject-object or verb-object-subject sentence, or
  • negates the predicate (when placed before the subject) in a subject-verb-object pronoun in either past and future tense.
"Jendê" 
(from Tagalog "hindi" and Hiligaynon "indi")
  • Negates a verb in the present or future tense in a verb-subject-object or verb-object-subject sentence, or
  • negates the subject in a subject-verb-object sentence.
"Nunca" 
(from Spanish for "no" or "never")
  • Negate a verb in the past or future tensein a verb-subject-object or verb-object-subject sentence, or
  • negates the subject in a subject-verb-object sentence where the verb is in future.
Hello. 
Buenos días. ( )
How are you? 
Que tal tu? ( ?)
Fine, thank you. 
Muy bien, gracias. ( )
What is your name? 
Qué nombre tuyo? ( ?)
My name is ______ . 
Mi nombre es ______ . ( _____ .)
Nice to meet you. 
Encantado/da. ( )
Please. 
Por favor. ( )
Thank you. 
Gracias. ( )
You're welcome. 
De nada. ( )
Yes. 
Sí. ( )
No. 
No. ( )
Excuse me. (getting attention
. ( )
Excuse me. (begging pardon
Disculpé. ( )
I'm sorry. 
Disculpé. ( )
Goodbye 
Adiós. ( )
I can't speak Chavacano [well]. 
Jendê yo hablá [bien] Chavacano. ( [ ])
Do you speak English? 
Ta hablá Ingles? ( ?)
Is there someone here who speaks English? 
Tiené aquí que hablá Ingles? ( ?)
Help! 
Ayuda! ( !)
Look out! 
Cuidado! (kwee-DA-doh!, often reduced to kwee-DA-oh)
Good morning. 
Buenos días . ( )
Good evening. 
Buenos tardes. ( )
Good night. 
Buenos noches. ( )
I don't understand. 
Jendê intindé. (HEN-de' een-tin-DEH)
Where is the toilet? 
Donde el CR/casillas? ( ?)

ProblemsEdit

Leave me alone. 
Dejamé. (de-hah-MEH.)
Don't touch me! 
No yo toqué! (noh yoh toh-KEH!)
I'll call the police. 
Ay llamá el policía. ( .)
Police! 
Policía! (po-lee-SEE-ah!)
Stop! Thief! 
Pará! Ladrón! (pah-RAH! lad-ROHN!)
I need your help. 
Necesitá yo con ayuda tuyo. (ne-se-see-TAH yoh con ah-YOO-dah TOO-yoh.)
There's an accident. 
Tiené un accidente. (tee-eh-NE uhn ack-see-DEN-teh.)
I'm lost. 
Perdido/da yo. ( .)
I lost my bag. 
Ta perdí mi bolsa. ( .)
I lost my wallet. 
Ta perdí mi petaca. ( .)
I lost my cellphone. 
Ta perdí mi teléfono. (.)
I've been robbed. 
Robado/da yo.
I'm sick. 
Enfermo/ma yo. ( .)
I've been injured. 
Herido/da yo. ( .)
Can I use your phone? 
Puede usá el teléfono tuyo? (pooh-EH-deh yo oo-SAH el teh-LEH-poh-noh?)

Medical emergenciesEdit

I need a doctor. 
Necesitá yo con un doctor. ( .)
Where's the nearest hospital? 
Donde el hospital más cercano? (DON-deh el hohs-pee-TAHL mas sehr-KAH-noh?)
Please bring me to the doctor. 
Llevá yo al doctor, por favor. ( .)
Please call an ambulance. 
Llamá yo con un ambulancia. ( .)
I need first aid. 
Necesitá yo con first aid.

Natural disastersEdit

Earthquake 
temblor ( )
Flood 
diluvio ( )
Tornado 
ipo-ipo ( )
Typhoon 
bagyo ( )
Volcano
vulcán ( )

NumbersEdit

uno (OO-noh)
dos (doss)
tres (tress)
cuatro (KWAT-roh)
cinco (SING-koh)
seis (seh-EES)
siete (see-EH-teh)
ocho (OH-cho)
nueve (nooh-EH-beh)
10 
diez (dee-ESS)
11 
once (ON-seh)
12 
doce (DOH-seh)
13 
trece (TREH-seh)
14 
catorce (kah-TOHR-seh)
15 
quince (KEEN-ce)
16 
dieciseis (dee-eh-see-seh-IS)
17 
diecisiete (dee-eh-see-see-EH-teh)
18 
dieciocho (dee-eh-see-OH-cho)
19 
diecinueve (dee-eh-see-noo-EH-beh)
20 
veinte (beh-EEN-teh)
21 
veintiuno (beh-een-tee-OO-noh)
22 
veintidós ( )
23 
veintitres ( )
30 
treinta ( )
40 
cuarenta ( )
50 
cinquenta ( )
60 
seisenta ( )
70 
sietenta ( )
80 
ochenta ( )
90 
noventa ( )
100 
un ciento ( )
200 
dos ciento ( )
300 
tres ciento ( )
1,000 
uno mil ( )
2,000 
dos mil ( )
1,000,000 
un milión ( )
1,000,000,000 
un bilión ( )
1,000,000,000,000 
un trilión ( )
half 
medio (meh-DEE-oh)
less 
menos (MEH-nohs)
more 
mas (mass)

Due to American English influence, Chavacano uses the short scale for larger numbers unlike in mainstream Spanish. So, a billion in Chavacano means a "thousand million", not a "million million" as in the Spanish-speaking world.

TimeEdit

now 
hoy (hoy)
later 
más tarde (mas TAHR-deh)
before 
antes (AHN-tess)
morning 
mañana (ma-NYAH-nah)
afternoon 
tarde (TAHR-de)
evening/night 
noche (NOh-cheh)

Clock timeEdit

one o'clock AM 
a la una de madrugada (ah lah OO-nah de mad-roo-GAH-dah)
two o'clock AM 
a las dos de madrugada (ah lass doss de mad-roo-GAH-dah)
noon 
mediodía (meh-dee-oh-DEE-ah)
one o'clock PM 
a la una de tarde ( )
two o'clock PM 
a las dos de tarde ( )
midnight 
madrugada (mad-roo-GAH-dah)
What time is it?
Qué hora? ( )

DurationEdit

_____ minute(s) 
______ minuto (______ mee-NOO-toh)
_____ hour(s) 
______ hora (______ HOH-rah)
_____ day(s) 
______ día (______ DEE-ah)
_____ week(s) 
______ semana (______ seh-MAH-nah)
_____ month(s) 
______ mes[es] (______ mes[sehss] )
_____ year(s) 
______ año[s] (ah-NYOH)

DaysEdit

today 
ahora ( )
yesterday 
ayer ( )
tomorrow 
manaña ( )
this week 
esta semana ( )
last week 
semana pasada ( )
next week 
semana que viene ( )
Sunday 
Domingo ( )
Monday 
Lunes ( )
Tuesday 
Martes ( )
Wednesday 
Miercoles ( )
Thursday 
Jueves ( )
Friday 
Viernes ( )
Saturday 
Sábado ( )

MonthsEdit

January 
Enero ( )
February 
Febrero ( )
March 
Marzo ( )
April 
Abril ( )
May 
Mayo ( )
June 
Junio ( )
July 
Julio ( )
August 
Agosto ( )
September 
Septiembre ( )
October 
Octubre ( )
November 
Noviembre ( )
December 
Deciembre ( )

Writing time and dateEdit

The 12-hour clock is generally used, as with the rest of the Philippines. Times are written as in English, but spoken as in Spanish, so 1:23 AM is said as a la una y veintitres de madrugada.

Dates are written usually in day-month-year format. Like most Philippine languages, due to English language influence, names of days and months are capitalized.

ColorsEdit

black 
itém (ee-TEHM), negro ( )
white 
putê (pooh-TEH'), blanco ( )
gray 
abó (ah-BOH)
red 
rojo ( )
blue 
azul ( )
yellow 
amarillo (ah-mah-REEL-loh or ah-ma-REE-lee-oh), dilaw (dee-LAO)
green 
verde (BEAR-deh)
orange 
( )
purple 
purpura ( )
brown 
marrón ( ), café (kah-PEH)

TransportationEdit

Car
auto (AW-to), coche (KOH-cheh)
Taxi
taxi (TAHK-see)
Jeepney
jeep
Bus
bus (boos)
Truck
trak
Bicycle
bicicleta (bee-seek-LEH-tah)
Motorcycle
motorciclo (moh-tohr-SEEK-loh)
Tricycle
tricycle (TRY-see-kehl)
Boat
banca (BANG-kah)
Ferry/ship
barco (BAR-koh)
Airplane
aeroplano (ah-eh-roh-PLAH-noh)

BusEdit

How much is a ticket to _____? 
Cuanto un bolete a _______? ( )
One ticket to _____, please. 
Un bolete a ______, por favor. ( )
Where does this bus go? 
Adonde andá este bus? ( )
Where is the bus to _____? 
Donde el bus a ______ ( )
Does this bus stop in _____? 
Ya pará este bus a _______? ( )
When does the bus for _____ leave? 
Cuanto el bus a ______ largá? ( )
When will this bus arrive in _____?
Cuanto ay llegá este bus a ______? ( )

DirectionsEdit

How do I get to _____ ? 
Como andá ______? (KOH-moh an-DAH)
...the bus station? 
al terminal de bus (al TEHR-mee-nahl de boos)
...the airport? 
al aeropuerto (al a-eh-roh-poo-EHR-to)
...downtown? 
al ciudad/población ( )
...the _____ hotel? 
al hotel or a [name of the hotel]? ( )
Where are there a lot of 
Donde tiené mucho ( )
...hotels? 
hotel? ( )
...restaurants? 
restaurante? ( )
...bars? 
bar? ( )
...sites to see? 
 ? ( )
Can you show me on the map? 
( )
street 
calle ( )
avenue 
avenida ( )
corner 
canto ( )
Turn left. 
( )
Turn right. 
( )
left 
( )
right 
( )
straight ahead 
( )
towards the a _____ 
( )
past the _____ 
( )
before the _____ 
( )
Watch for the _____. 
( )
intersection 
( )
north 
norte ( )
south 
sur ( )
east 
este ( )
west 
oeste ( )
uphill 
cuesta arriba ( )
downhill 
cuesta abajo ( )

JeepneysEdit

Stop! (to get off the jeepney)
( )
One/two/three to _______, please.
Uno/dos/tres hasta _______, por favor. ( )
How much is the fare to ______?
Cuánto el pasaje hasta _______? ( )
Driver/Sir, where's my change?
Manong, donde mi suklê? ( )
Driver/Sir, you have excess change.
Manong, bien el suklê tuyo.
Can you drop me off at _______?
Puede kamo dejalo yo en ______? ( )

Taxi/tricycleEdit

There are not much any taxis in Zamboanga City, and there are none either on Basilan.

Taxi! 
Taxi! ( )
Take me to _____, please. 
Llevá yo a ______, por favor. ( )
How much does it cost to get to _____? 
Cuanto el pasaje hasta ______? ( )
Take me there, please. 
( )

LodgingEdit

Do you have any rooms available? 
Tiené kamo un cuarto vacante?( )
How much is a room for one person/two people? 
Cuánto un cuarto para un/dos persona? ( )
Does the room come with... 
Tiené ... el cuarto? ( )
...an air-conditioner? 
un air-con? ( )
...bedsheets? 
( )
...a bathroom? 
un baño ( )
...Internet access?
Internet ( )
...pillows?
el maga almujada. (el MAH-ga al-moo-HA-dah)
...a telephone? 
un teléfono? ( )
...a TV? 
un TV/televisión ( )
May I see the room first? 
Puede mirá el cuarto primero? ( )
Do you have anything quieter? 
Tiené algo mas tranquilo? ( )
...bigger? 
mas grande? ( )
...cleaner? 
mas limpio? ( )
...cheaper? 
mas barato? ( )
OK, I'll take it. 
Sigue, ay tomá ele. ( )
I will stay for _____ night(s).
Ay dormí yo por _____ dia. ( )
Can you suggest another hotel? 
( )
Do you have a safe? 
Tiené un safe/caja de hierro? ( )
...lockers? 
locker/armario ( )
Is breakfast/supper included? 
Incluido el almorzal/cena? ( )
What time is breakfast/supper? 
Qué hora el cena/almorzar ( )
Please clean my room. 
Por favor, limpiá mi cuarto. ( )
Can you wake me at _____? 
Puede despertá yo a la ______? ( )
I want to check out. 
Queré yo check-out. ( )
Who's knocking on the door? 
Qué ta tuktok a la puerta?
The toilet is not working. 
Jendeh funcioná el inodoro.

MoneyEdit

Do you accept American/Australian/Canadian dollars? 
Aceptá kamo con American/Australian/Canadian dollars? ( )
Do you accept British pounds? 
Aceptá kamo con British pounds? ( )
Do you accept Euros? 
Aceptá kamo con euro? ( )
Do you accept credit cards? 
Aceptá kamo con [el maga] credit card? ( )
Can you change money for me? 
( )
Where can I get money changed? 
Donde puede cambia cuarta? ( )
What is the exchange rate for ______? 
( )
Where is an automatic teller machine (ATM)? 
Donde un ATM? ( )

EatingEdit

A table for one person/two people, please. 
Un mesa para un/dos persona, por favor. ( )
Can I look at the menu, please? 
Puede mirá el menu, por favor? ( )
Can I look in the kitchen? 
Puede mirá el cocina? ( )
Is there a house specialty? 
Tiené kamo specialty? ( )
Is there a local specialty? 
( )
I'm a vegetarian. 
Vegetarian yo ( )
I don't eat pork. 
No hay comí yo con baboy. ( )
I don't eat beef. 
No hay comí yo con vaca. ( )
I only eat Halal food. 
Comí solamente yo con comida Halal. ( )
Can you make it "lite", please? (less oil/butter/lard
( )
It's so salty.
Muy salado este.
It's so sweet.
Muy dulce ele.
It's so sour. 
Muy amargo ele.
It's so spicy.
Muy picante ele.
breakfast 
almorzar ( )
lunch 
( )
afternoon snack 
merienda ( )
supper 
cena ( )
I want _____. 
Quiere yo con ______ ( )
I want a dish containing _____. 
( )
chicken 
manok ( ), pollo ( )
beef 
vaca ( )
fish 
pescado ( )
ham 
jamon ( )
pork
baboy ( ), puerco ( ), cerdo ( )
sausage 
longanisa (local sausage, )
cheese 
queso ( )
eggs 
huevo ( )
salad 
( )
(fresh) vegetables 
verdadura (fresca) ( )
(fresh) fruit 
fruta (fresca) ( )
bread 
pan ( )
toast 
( )
noodles 
( )
rice 
kanon ( ), arroz ( )
beans 
( )
A glass of _____, please. 
Un vaso de ______, por favor. ( )
A cup of _____, please. 
Un taza de ______, por favor. ( )
A bottle of _____, please. Un botella de ______, por favor. 
( )
coffee 
café (kah-FEH)
tea (drink
( )
juice 
( )
water 
agua ( )
beer 
beer ( ), cerveza ( )
red/white wine 
( )
May I have some _____? 
Puede pedír ______? ( )
salt 
sal ( )
black pepper 
pimienta ( )
soy sauce 
toyô (TOH-yoh')
butter 
mantequilla ( )
Excuse me, waiter? (getting attention of server)
Servidor/dora! ( )
I'm finished. Acabado/da yo
( )
It was delicious. 
Delicioso ele. ( )
Please clear the plates. 
Por favor, tomá el maga plato. ( )
The check, please. 
La cuenta, por favor. ( )

BarsEdit

Do you serve alcohol? 
Tiené alak? ( )
Is there table service? 
Tiené kamo table service? ( )
A beer/two beers, please. 
Un/dos cerveza, por favor ( )
A glass of red/white wine, please. 
( )
A pint, please. 
Un medio litro, por favor. ( )
A bottle, please. 
Un botella, por favor. ( )
_____ (hard liquor) and _____ (mixer), please. 
______ y ______, por favor ( )
whiskey 
whiskey ( )
vodka 
vodka ( )
rum 
rum ( )
water 
agua ( )
club soda 
( )
tonic water 
tonic ( )
orange juice 
( )
Coke (soda
soft drinks ( )
Do you have any bar snacks? 
Tiené chichiría? ( )
One more, please. 
Un otro, por favor. ( )
Another round, please. 
( )
When is closing time? 
Cuando kamo ay cerrá? ( )
Cheers! 
( )

ShoppingEdit

Places to shop


Market (in general
mercado
Traditional wet and dry market 
palenque
Flea market 
tiangue
Mall 
mall
Supermarket 
supermercado (though this term is dropping in favor of the English)
Do you have this in my size? 
Tiené este para mi talla? (tee-EH-neh ES-teh PAH-ra mee ta-LEE-uh)
How much is this? 
Cuanto este? (KWAN-toh ES-teh)
That's too expensive.
Bien caro eso. ( )
Would you take _____? 
( )
expensive 
caro ( )
cheap 
barato ( )
I can't afford it. 
( )
I don't want it. 
Jendê yo queré elo ( )
You're cheating me. 
Ta engañá vo yo ( )
I'm not interested. 
Jendê yo interesado. (..)
OK, I'll take it. 
( )
Can I have a bag? 
( )
Do you ship (overseas)? 
( )
I need... 
Necesitá yo con ( )
...toothpaste. 
toothpaste ( )
...a toothbrush.
un cepillo ( )
...tampons. 
un napkin. ( )
...soap. 
sabón (sah-BOHN)
...shampoo. 
shampoo. ( )
...pain reliever. (e.g., aspirin or ibuprofen
( )
...cold medicine. 
medicina para el tos ( )
...stomach medicine. 
medicina para el dolor de estómago ... ( )
...a razor. 
un navaja. ( )
...an umbrella. 
un paraguas. ( )
...sunblock lotion. 
sunblock. ( )
...a postcard. 
un postcard. ( )
...postage stamps. 
el maga sello. ( )
...batteries. 
bateria. ( )
...writing paper. 
papel. ( )
...a pen. 
un bolpen. ( )
...a pencil. 
un lápiz. ( )
...English-language books. 
el maga libro en Ingles ( )
...English-language magazines. 
el maga magasina en Ingles. ( )
...an English-language newspaper. 
un diario en Ingles. ( )
...an English-English dictionary. 
un diccionario en Ingles ( )

DrivingEdit

Like the most of the Philippines, most road signs are in English.

I want to rent a car. 
Queré yo alquilá con auto ( )
Can I get insurance? 
Puede yo tomá con insurance? ( )
no parking 
( )
gas (petrol) station 
gasolinera ( )
petrol 
gasolina ( )
diesel 
crudo ( )
My car stalled. 
Ya estancá mi auto. ( )
I need a mechanic. 
Necesitá ya con un mecánico. ( )

AuthorityEdit

I haven't done anything wrong. 
No hay yo hacé nada male. ( )
It was a misunderstanding. 
( )
Where are you taking me? 
Adonde yo ay llevá ? ( )
Am I under arrest? 
Ta arrestado yo? ( )
I am an American/Australian/British/Canadian citizen. 
Ciudadano Americano/Australiano/Britón/Canadiano yo ( )
I want to talk to the American/Australian/British/Canadian embassy/consulate. 
Queré yo hablá al embajada/consulado de la Estados Unidos/Australia/Britania/Canada ( )
I want to talk to a lawyer. 
Queré yo hablá un abogado ( )
Can I just pay a fine now? 
Puede pagá mi multa ahora? ( )
This Chavacano phrasebook is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!