Open main menu

road of premodern Japan. sometimes mean region (see Q1196306)
Itineraries > Asia itineraries > The Tokaido Road


The Tōkaidō road was an important route during the Edo period. While today it is still an important route connecting Tokyo and Kyoto, the road plays an important part of The Golden Route, which is one popular itinerary for first time visitors to Japan. While the road started in Edo (now Tokyo) and ended in Kyoto, it was extended to include Osaka in 1620's. Today, the Golden Route follows the extended route to Osaka. While back then the road took up to 2 weeks to complete, Golden Route itineraries today usually run for 5-7 days.

UnderstandEdit

Kaidō were roads which were created during the Edo period (1603-1868). These roads served multiple purposes, including trade, diplomacy and pilgrimage. There were five major Kaido called the Edo Five Routes, which were administered routes from Edo to the outer provinces.  The Tōkaidō road, which roughly translates to "eastern sea route", was the most important route as it followed the east coast of Japan's main island, Honshu. Similar routes were less travelled, as they went into mountainous areas of the island. The journey stopped at over 50 locations along the coast. While the road may have been travelled by foot or by cart, many of these ancient and historical routes have been incorporated in modern day Japan. The Tokaido Shinkansen follows the road closely, and is what makes this long, almost two-week journey, into what is now a short half day trip. The Golden Route follows the route of the Tokaido Shinkansen, and visits several populous cities across the East Coast, seeing many castles, temples and natural wonders, including multiple UNESCO World Heritage Sites. This itinerary varies, but usually involves travellers arriving at one of Tokyo's airports, then sightseeing Tokyo, before travelling on the Shinkansen to stop at Hakone & Mt Fuji, then stopping at Kyoto for a few days, before traveling to Nara, and flying out of Osaka. Some extended itineraries continue traveling east to include the towns of Hiroshima and Himeji.

Since the growth of the Shinkansen network, other Prefectures have created similar routes for travellers. For example, The New Golden Route is a route between Tokyo and Osaka, but visits cities in the north across the Sea of Japan. While you still arrive in Tokyo, you then travel on the Hokuriku Shinkansen as you site see Takasaki, Nagano, Kurobe, and Kanazawa, before traveling to Omi-Takashima, Kyoto and Osaka via local trains. The Diamond route is a similar route on the Hokkaido island.

PrepareEdit

See also: Rail travel in Japan

The routes described are possible now due to the Shinkansen network.

Get inEdit

GoEdit

This section will list each of the historical post stations of this road. Ones asterisked are stops on the Tokaido Shinkansen.

The Tōkaidō Road to KyotoEdit

* TokyoEdit

    Starting Location: Nihonbashi (Chūō-ku)

Nihonbashi is a bridge in the old heart of Japan. Tokyo Station is only a short walk from the bridge.

  * 1. Shinagawa-juku (Shinagawa)

Kanagawa PrefectureEdit

    2. Kawasaki-juku (Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki)

    3. Kanagawa-juku (Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama)

    4. Hodogaya-juku (Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama)

    5. Totsuka-juku (Totsuka-ku, Yokohama)

    6. Fujisawa-shuku (Fujisawa)

    7. Hiratsuka-juku (Hiratsuka)

    8. Ōiso-juku (Ōiso, Naka District)

    9. Odawara-juku (Odawara)

    10. Hakone-juku (Hakone, Ashigarashimo District)

Shizuoka PrefectureEdit

* Atami Station

    11. Mishima-shuku (Mishima)

    12. Numazu-juku (Numazu)

    13. Hara-juku (Numazu)

    * 14. Yoshiwara-juku (Fuji)

    * 15. Kanbara-juku (Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka)

    16. Yui-shuku (Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka)

    17. Okitsu-juku (Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka)

    18. Ejiri-juku (Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka)

    19. Fuchū-shuku (Aoi-ku, Shizuoka)

    20. Mariko-juku (Suruga-ku, Shizuoka)

    21. Okabe-juku (Fujieda)

    22. Fujieda-juku (Fujieda)

    23. Shimada-juku (Shimada)

    24. Kanaya-juku (Shimada)

    * 25. Nissaka-shuku (Kakegawa)

    26. Kakegawa-juku (Kakegawa)

    27. Fukuroi-juku (Fukuroi)

    28. Mitsuke-juku (Iwata)

    * 29. Hamamatsu-juku (Naka-ku, Hamamatsu)

    30. Maisaka-juku (Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu)

    31. Arai-juku (Kosai)

    32. Shirasuka-juku (Kosai)

Aichi PrefectureEdit

    * 33. Futagawa-juku (Toyohashi)

    34. Yoshida-juku (Toyohashi)

    35. Goyu-shuku (Toyokawa)

    36. Akasaka-juku (Toyokawa)

    37. Fujikawa-shuku (Okazaki)

    38. Okazaki-shuku (Okazaki) (also part of the Shio no Michi)

* Mikawa-Anjō StationEdit

    39. Chiryū-juku (Chiryū)

    40. Narumi-juku (Midori-ku, Nagoya)

    * 41. Miya-juku (Atsuta-ku, Nagoya)

* Gifu-Hashima Station

Mie PrefectureEdit

(At this point the two routes divert, with the Shinkansen traveling to Maibara, Shinga, while the road traveling down to the Mie Prefecture. The routes connect back at Ōtsu.)

    42. Kuwana-juku (Kuwana)

    43. Yokkaichi-juku (Yokkaichi)

    44. Ishiyakushi-juku (Suzuka)

    45. Shōno-juku (Suzuka)

    46. Kameyama-juku (Kameyama)

    47. Seki-juku (Kameyama)

    48. Sakashita-juku (Kameyama)

Shiga PrefectureEdit

* Maibara Station

    49. Tsuchiyama-juku (Kōka)

    50. Minakuchi-juku (Kōka)

    51. Ishibe-juku (Konan)

    52. Kusatsu-juku (Kusatsu)

    53. Ōtsu-juku (Ōtsu)

Kyoto PrefectureEdit

    * Ending Location: Sanjō Ōhashi (Kyoto)

Sanjō Ōhashi is also a bridge into Kyoto.

The Ōsaka Kaidō ExtensionEdit

Kyoto PrefectureEdit

54. Fushimi-juku (Fushimi-ku, Kyoto)

55. Yodo-juku (Fushimi-ku, Kyoto)

Osaka PrefectureEdit

    56. Hirakata-juku (Hirakata)

    57. Moriguchi-juku (Moriguchi)

    * Ending location: Kōraibashi (Chūō-ku, Osaka)

Stay safeEdit

Go nextEdit

Some Golden Route tours go beyond Osaka, travelling to Hiroshima and Himeji.

This itinerary to The Tokaido Road is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!