unique or novel device, method, composition or process

The Discover page is an archive of about strange but true trivia about destinations around the world, previously featured in the Discover section on the main page. You can contribute and add or edit future facts to the list here. Previously displayed facts from this year are below. You can find older facts from previous years using the links at the bottom of the page.

March 2021Edit

  • Climbing from sea level to 866 m (2841 ft) in 20 km (12 mi), the Flåm railway (view from train pictured) the third steepest normal railroad in the world.


February 2021Edit

  • In Ajaccio you can visit the house where Napoleon was born, which is now a museum.
  • Queen Juliana Bridge in Willemstad is the highest bridge in the Caribbean.
  • At the McDonald's in Taupo you can have your meal in a decommisioned airplane (pictured).
  • The seat of the Sicilian Parliament, Palazzo dei Normanni in Palermo, is the oldest royal residence in Europe and once housed the rulers of the Kingdom of Sicily.
  • In Fort Worth you can visit two museums presenting the life of women and non-white cowboys in the Old West.
  • At the Daio Wasabi Farm (pictured) in Azumino, the largest in Japan, you can make your own wasabi pickle.
  • Due to how the city's Bashkir name is written in the Cyrillic script, Ufa is sometimes nicknamed the City of Three Screws.
  • The architecture of the Azadi Tower in Tehran, constructed to commemorate the 2,500th anniversary of the Persian Empire, combines elements of Sassanid and Islamic architecture.
  • From 1562 to 1792, emperors of the Holy Roman Empire were crowned in the Kaiserdom (pictured) in Frankfurt.
  • The Elkmont Historic District is a ghost town within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
  • Bambara is heavily influenced by French, and even the slightest knowledge of French will make it easier to remember words.
  • Port Royal (remains pictured) outside Kingston was once the largest city in the Caribbean and perhaps its most notorious base for pirates and privateers.
  • Coonoor provides the traveller with the panoramic view of the lush green Nilgiri hills, with its ravines, valleys, and waterfalls.
  • Chester - or "Deva" in Latin - was one of the great military bases in Roman England, and as such, has its fair share of Roman ruins.
  • Les Almadies (pictured) in Dakar is the western tip of the African continent with plenty of seafood restaurants.
  • One of the last large wildernesses close to Helsinki, in Sipoonkorpi National Park you can reportedly encounter all mammal and bird species that are common in Southern Finland.
  • Shakhmansur Bazaar is the biggest bazaar in downtown Dushanbe and has a huge variety of foods, as well as an odd assortment of tools and household products.
  • Moored across the river from downtown Wilmington, USS North Carolina (guns pictured) offers visitors the chance to envision the daily life and fierce combat her crew faced in the Pacific Theatre during World War II.
  • High over Kavala a big white cross can be seen from everywhere in the town.
  • Brazil's cuisine is as varied as its geography and culture, based on the variety of crops, livestock and seafood produced in the country.
  • Sasanaramsi Burmese Buddhist Temple (standing Buddha at the temple pictured) in Singapore is the only Buddhist temple outside Myanmar to be built in the traditional Burmese architectural style.
  • Estelí has historically been and continues to be a Sandinista stronghold and you can see almost as many murals bearing witness of this as in León.
  • Musée International du Golfe de Guinée in Lomé houses a quite large collection of authentic mainly West African historical items.
  • During the colonial period, the Germans left a distinct mark on Qingdao's architecture that can still be seen in its historic center and train station (pictured).
  • Famous for its Catalan origins, Alghero was known in the past as "la Barceloneta sarda", little Sardinian Barcelona.
  • One of the most famous streets in New York City if not the world, Broadway has a history reaching back to pre-Columbian times.
  • At 56 m, Zenkov's Cathedral (pictured) in Almaty is among the tallest wooden buildings in the world, which you wouldn't guess from the smoothly painted exterior hues of custard, icing sugar and coloured marzipan.


January 2021Edit

  • Due to the white color of the sand in the White Sands National Park, some animals have evolved lighter coloration, resulting in white reptiles, mammals, and invertebrates that blend with their white background.
  • A sculpture from 1960 showing whalers in action, the Whaling Monument is Sandefjord's most famous attraction.
  • Bodrum Castle (pictured) is one of the world's best preserved monuments dating back to medieval times.
  • In Baisha near Lijiang you can see Buddhist murals that reflect a fusion of Han Chinese and Tibetan painting techniques with Naxi cultural traditions.
  • The region of and around the Turkey Run State Park is indeed known for its population of wild turkeys.
  • Traben-Trarbach (pictured) is one of the most charming wine towns along the Mosel River.
  • A supra (Georgian banquet) always features a tamada, a master of ceremonies nominated by the host, who is responsible for the toasts, for keeping the party going, and keeping the guests joyful.
  • The Lusatian Lake District is a collection of artificial lakes created from former open-pit lignite mines
  • The kasbah (old town) of Rabat has narrow streets with cute white and blue houses (pictured).
  • Burnham Market is one of the five Norfolk Burnhams in existence today–there were originally seven.
  • Described as a football temple, Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti in Buenos Aires is the largest stadium in Argentina and home to the national football team.
  • The Black Sand Beach (pictured) in Vík í Mýrdal is famous for its basalt stacks and black lava sands.
  • As mountains are by their nature hard to reach, traditionally cheese produced there had to be of a variety that stores well and can be collected for later sale.
  • Perth has an enormous traditional arts scene.
  • The Dome of Light (pictured) in Kaohsiung is the world's largest stained glass installation.
  • If you visit Tikal early enough in the morning, it's possible to see and hear monkeys.
  • Basketball is one of the most popular team sports in North America, both as a spectactor sport and as an activity.
  • The French language originated in France, but in the modern day it is spoken on every continent (French speaking areas pictured).
  • The wooden roof of the 11th century Ancona Cathedral is in the shape of an upside-down boat and its most obvious feature is the 12-sided cupola.
  • Some towns owe their existence or at least their current size to mining.
  • Buffalo History Museum (pictured) has by far the most extensive collection of artifacts relevant to the history of Buffalo and Western New York from pre-Columbian times to the present day.
  • Sakhalin has long been the scene of a power struggle between major Asian powers.
  • Townsville on the Australian Pacific coast enjoys an average of 320 days of sunshine a year.
  • Completed in 1929, Havana's neoclassical El Capitolio (pictured) resembles the U.S. Capitol and housed the Cuban Congress prior to the revolution.
  • The San Gabriel mountains above Pasadena offer some excellent hiking opportunities.
  • Compared to the hectic, bustling capitals in other Southeast Asian countries, Vientiane's relaxing atmosphere makes it feel like the small town it is.
  • The most prized piece of art in Klosterneuburg Monastery is the triptych Verduner Altar (pictured), painted in 1181 by Nicholas of Verdun.
  • God's Own Junkyard in Walthamstow displays hundreds of illuminated signs including signs of businesses, decorative signs, movie props and artworks.
  • Inca legend says that Viracocha, the bearded god who created the universe, emerged from the waters of Lake Titicaca and created the sun at Isla del Sol.
  • With a maximum height between 260 and 312 m, King Fahd's Fountain (pictured) in Jeddah is the tallest in the world.
  • At the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka in Ballarat, you can learn about the 1854 Eureka miners' rebellion and the changes it caused in Australian democracy.
  • Shirakawa is famous in the region for its unique daruma (wooden doll) design.


Old discoveriesEdit